Monthly Archives: March 2008

Pau Gasol

My favourite song

MANOWAR – MASTER OF THE WIND (THE TRIUMPH OF STEEL)In the silence of the darkness when all are fast asleep
I live inside a dream calling to your spirit
As a sail calls the wind, hear the angels sing

Far beyond the sun across the western sky
Reach into the blackness find a silver line
In a voice I whisper a candle in the night
We’ll carry all our dreams in a single beam of light

Close your eyes, look into the dream
Winds of change will winds of fortune bring

Fly away to a rainbow in the sky gold is at the end for each of us to find
There the road begins where another one will end
Here the four winds know who will break and who will bend
All to be the master of the wind

Falling stars now light my way
My life was written on the wind
Clouds above, clouds below
High ascend the dreams within

When the wind fills the sky the clouds will move aside
And there will be the road to all our dreams
For any day that stings two better days it brings

Nothing is as bad as it seems
Close your eyes, look into the dream
Wins of change will winds of fortune bring

Fly away to a rainbow in the sky gold is at the end for each of us to find
There the road begins where another one will end
Here the four winds know who will break and who will bend
All to be the master of the wind

Tibet

Why Tibet? An Introduction to the Question of Tibet

Why is there an outcry about Tibet? Why is a nation larger than Western Europe held captive and tortured by a foreign power, while the world’s leaders stand by or deny responsibility for doing business with the oppressor? Why is Tibet’s situation important right now?The pages below tell how Tibet has come to the most perilous moment in its 3,000 year existence. It is a common theme of history; many ancient and peaceful indigenous civilizations have been assaulted by military powers in search of land and booty. Tibet, an independent nation until the Chinese invasion, is now faced with extinction. But it is not yet too late.

It would be very difficult to oust the Chinese by armed force, and it would go against the Tibetan Buddhist belief in non-violence. Instead, His Holiness the Dalai Lama and the Tibetan people have used diplomacy and non-violent activism in the hopes that the People’s Republic of China will be condemned and pressured to withdraw its occupation forces from Tibet.

It is our belief that anyone who hears of what has happened in Tibet will support its cause. But the Tibetans must be heard. Please read on to find out why Tibet needs and deserves your support. If you are moved to become actively involved, contact a Tibet Support Group near you.

In a world where terrorism gets so much attention, it is important to support those who are willing to brave the path of peace.

(www.tibet.org)

Homer´s Enemy

homer.png 

 Fun way to learn english:

From the episode ‘Homer’s Enemy’

(In Sector 7G, Homer spins around in his chair) 
Homer: Chair goes round, chair goes round, chair goes round…
Lenny: Hey, Homer, are you busy?
Homer: Yes.
Carl: There’s a new guy at the plant. Maybe we ought to say hi to him.
Homer: I don’t know… I’m kind of dizzy. I should probably go home sick.
to spin around dar vueltas, girar
to go round dar vueltas, girar
to be busy estar ocupado
ought to deber. Un sinónimo de este modal verb es should.
kind of algo
dizzy mareado
to go home sick irse a casa con parte de enfermo

(www.saberingles.com)

Gossip

gossip.jpgThis word derives from the Old English term “godsibb”, which meant “godfather” (“sibb” meant “kin”). The term was then started to be used to refer to any women friends who attended the mother at the time of the birth of her child. But in the late 16th century, gossip became to be used to describe the iddle chatter with friends or acquaintances, maybe like the one those women used to have.

Esta palabra proviene de “godsibb”, vocablo del inglés antiguo que significaba “godfather” (padrino), “sib” significaba “pariente”. El término se comenzó a usar para referirse a las amigas que acmpañaban a una madre en el momento de dar a luz. Pero a finales del siglo XVI, gossip se empezó a utilizar para describir las charlas informales con amigos o conocidos, probablemente tal como las que tenían aquellas amigas.

Anna Politkovskaya

Anna Politkovskaya, murdered in her Moscow apartment building on 7 October 2006, was one of the few Russian journalists reporting on events in Chechnya. An illustrated article by her on torture there had been due to appear on 9 October in the twice-weekly newspaper Novaya Gazeta. Her killer did not even trouble to hide his face or deactivate the building’s surveillance camera. He has not yet been identified.

Politkovskaya, who had two children, was born in 1958 in New York, where her Russian-Ukrainian parents were Soviet diplomats for the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). She studied journalism at Moscow University and in 1982 began working for the newspaper Izvestia, and later for the airline Aeroflot. From 1994 to 1999, she was an editor with Obschchaya Gazeta and from 1999 with Novaya Gazeta.

She was well-known for her coverage of Chechnya, which she had visited more than 40 times. In 1998, she interviewed Chechen President Aslan Maskhadov and was the only Russian journalist who reported on the second Chechnya war that began in 1999.

Politkovskaya’s commitment went far beyond journalism. She sometimes went before courts with Russian women whose sons had been killed in Chechnya, and she served as a mediator during the September 2002 Moscow theatre hostage-taking. An apparent attempt to poison her while on her way to report on the school hostage-taking in Beslan (Ossetia) in September 2004 prevented her from covering the event, in more than three hundred people were killed.

As well as her journalism, she had published several books on Russia and Russian policy in Chechnya and had become very well-known in the West.

Politkovskaya tackled many taboo subjects in her reporting and openly criticised Russian President Vladimir Putin. “As long as he’s in power, Russia won’t be a democratic country,” she said. She also heavily criticised Chechnya’s pro-Russian president, Ramzan Kadyrov.

She had received death threats which in 2001 drove her into exile in Austria. Friends said she had felt threatened in recent months but refused to consider going into exile again.

Politkovskaya received many awards for her courageous search for the truth, including the Russian Union of Journalists’ Golden Pen Prize (2000), the International Pen Club Prize (2002), the OSCE’s Journalism and Democracy Prize (2003) and the Olof Palme Prize (2004).

Sign the petition calling for an international commission of enquiry in order to establish the truth about Anna Politkovskaya’s murder on 7 October in Moscow

Sign the petition calling for an international commission of enquiry in order to establish the truth about her murder (WWW.RSF.ORG)

 

5 years…

20080319elpepuint_261.jpg20080319elpepuint_20.jpg20080319elpepuint_18.jpg(AP)